Food For Your Face

One of my readers asked a question that many of us have either thought of, googled, or tried…can I eat differently to help my complexion? The answer is…possibly! What we eat feeds every cell in our body. We are either eating to help our cells or what we are eating may actually be hurting our cells. There are a few questions we need to be asking: what should I eat to help my complexion and what foods could I be using topically (meaning on your face) to help my complexion?

Let’s start with what to eat. Here’s a list of the top 5 things you should be eating to help you complexion:

  1. Fats…but not just any fats! UNSATURATED fats, especially omega-3 fats. Unsaturated fats are found mostly in plant sources (olive oil, canola oil, olives, avocados, nuts, and seeds (flax, chia, pumpkin, sunflower). Omega-3 fatty acids are also found in plants as well as cold water fish. High sources of omega-3 fats are found in canola oil, walnuts, pecans, GROUND (and then refrigerated) flax seeds, chia seeds, salmon, tuna, mackerel, anchovies, and sardines. Eat up!
  2. Foods with vitamin C: citrus fruits, bell peppers, strawberries, broccoli/cauliflower, and leafy greens. Vitamin C is one of the building blocks for skin cells and it also helps to protect yourself from sun damage when you eat it.
  3. Foods with vitamin E: this wonder vitamin works similar to vitamin C in protecting your skin cells from damage. Nuts, seeds, oils, greens, and asparagus are all great sources of vitamin E.
  4. Foods with Biotin: Biotin is a B-vitamin and just like C and E is used as a building block of skin cells. Fun fact: your body makes a small amount of biotin! Cool right? But we still need more through our diet so shoot for foods like bananas, oatmeal, eggs, almonds, and peanuts/peanut butter.
  5. Foods with zinc: just like the rest of them we need zinc for upkeep on those skin cells. Research also shows that people who have a zinc deficiency are also more prone to acne. Zinc is found in animal sources like shell fish, red meat, and poultry.

IMPORTANT: I do not recommend taking a supplement for these vitamins or minerals unless you talk to your doctor or a dietitian. It is much better to get these vitamins and minerals through food because your body uses them more effectively. Remember that vitamins and minerals in supplement form are usually made in a laboratory with synthetic material not food.

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Top 5 things you may want to limit to help your complexion:

  1. Processed foods: boxed, highly processed foods have less nutrients than whole foods like grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, meats, and oils. Although it may fill your belly it may be emptying your nutrient reserves.
  2. Sugar: diets high in sugar and too high in carbohydrates may bring blood sugars up which releases insulin. Studies have shown that the more insulin released the more prone people may be to acne. Cut back on sugar (flavored creamer, candy, cookies, cakes pies, sodas) and eat carbohydrates in moderation (because they are definitely good to eat but eating too much of anything isn’t a good thing).
  3. Saturated fats: fats found in animal meats, butter, sour cream, cream cheese, and other animal products have saturated fats. These fats are what we call “inflammatory” fats meaning that they cause inflammation in the body. Too much inflammation can cause skin issues as well as other problems inside the body. Get more “good fats” and less saturated fats.
  4. Food irritants: some foods like strawberries, oranges, tomatoes, vinegar, avocado, some pit fruits, and others have been known to cause topical dermatitis meaning that if these foods touch the skin it can irritate it. If you think you may be affected by different foods it may be worth a trip to a dermatologist or an allergist just to make sure.
  5. Food allergens: shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, and gluten can all cause skin irritations. If you feel you have a food allergy please contact your doctor immediately to get tested.

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Feel like a spa retreat right in your own home? Here are some foods that you can actually put on skin to help improve your complexion.

  1. Apple cider vinegar: some people think this magical wonder is a cure all. The jury is still out for me but I use it every single day and it does have anti-bacterial/viral/fungal properties. I think it is important to use the apple cider vinegar with “mother” which is a film of good bacteria that helps in digestion and may help topically on your face. Mix the vinegar with water (1:3 vinegar to water ratio) and apply to your face as a cleanser.
  2. Lemons with oil: mix freshly squeezed lemons with your favorite oil (canola, almond, even coconut) and place on your face. You’ll be getting both vitamin C and vitamin E directly on to your skin which has shown to be beneficial.
  3. Avocado: this wonderful fruit is great for eating and for wearing! Smash up the avocado and apply it directly to your face. It helps if you puree it (add some lemon juice too).
  4. Anti-microbial foods: yogurt, honey, cinnamon, garlic, tea tree oil (not a food but a super anti-microbial) are all good for your face. One note about garlic and tea tree oil is they need diluted or they may cause more irritation on your skin. You can dilute them with an oil.
  5. Baking soda: it is a natural antiseptic meaning it can clean skin of bacteria. Mix a little baking soda with water, apple cider vinegar, or lemon and go to town. This will also help to exfoliate dead skin cells which could help to clear pores.

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The take away from this post is that yes, some food can help your complexion while some foods can potentially hurt it. Eating better is always the best recommendation I can make to anyone. Start where you are and make it better step by step. The facial masks are fun but you’ll be better off helping your skin from the inside out!

Smokey Chicken

This week my family (all 5 of us) were sick. We got a bad head cold and it ran through us like the plague! I hadn’t cooked all week because we were just surviving and who feels like cooking when you can’t taste it anyway, am I right? Finally last night I could kind of breathe again so I decided to make this delicious dish.

I found a recipe on Pinterest that looked really good a few months ago. What happens when I find recipes though, is I look for ways to “Amanda-fy” them…make them more of something that I’d like to eat, cook, or try out. This is one of those recipes that went from a Pinterest idea to something different.

Nutrition Lesson

Everyone talks about chicken breast and it being super lean source of protein. It really is BUT it can be more expensive than chicken thighs or drumsticks. Not everyone in the world has an unlimited budget that they can just willy nilly spend on food. I will be the first to tell you eating well does not have to be more expensive but there are certain tips and tricks I have in order to be able to say that with confidence. Like this chicken for instance. Although boneless skinless chicken breast is lean, chicken thighs and drumsticks aren’t as high in fat as most red meats.

I want us to be clear on what LEAN really means. When dietitians talk “lean meats” we are talking about the amount of fat in meats. For instance, haddock (the fish) is in the running for the leanest meat because it has a verrrrry tiny amount of fat in a 3 ounce serving (like about 1 gram of fat naturally). So when we say “lean” we are talking fat grams per 3 ounce serving. The leaner the meat the less fat it has, the less fat it has the less saturated fat (not so good for your heart fats) it has, the less saturated fat it has usually the less cholesterol it has (the stuff that can clog up your arteries), the less cholesterol it has usually the better it is for your heart and overall health.

Below is a nice little chart that shows how lean each meat is (I put them in order from least lean to leanest).

Meat Serving Calories Fat Grams

Saturated Fat

4 chicken wings 3 oz 426 35.9 14.1
Sausage links 3 oz 331 27 9.6
Prime rib 3 oz 276 21.6 8.7
Ground beef (80/20) 3 oz 230 15.2 5.7
Sirloin 3 oz 207 12.0 4.8
Bacon 3 slices 138 10.7 3.5
Ground beef (90/10) 3 oz 184 10.0 3.9
Chicken thigh (no skin) 3 oz 178 9.3 2.6
Ground turkey (93/7) 3 oz 128 7.1 1.8
Chicken breast (skin) 3 oz 156 7.0 1.8
Salmon 3 oz 144 5.7 1.2
Chicken drumstick (no skin) 3 oz 146 4.8 1.3
Pork loin or chop 3 oz 122 3.0 1.0
Chicken breast (no skin) 3 oz 122 3.0 0.7
Haddock 3 oz 95 0.8 0.1
Tuna 3 oz 99 0.7 0.2

Table information gathered from RD411, Calorie King, and Calorie Counter.

Yes. You read that right. Four wings. Not 6, not 12 but just 4. Regardless, the point of this blog is that skinless chicken thighs, drumsticks, and breast are all better choices than beef. Venison, grass-fed beef, buffalo, bison, and other wild game are in an awesome category of their own.

When eating well and eating on a budget needs to go hand in hand, stick with me and this blog. I won’t lead you astray!

Smoked paprika is the star of the show for this recipe. It’s not something I use often but it is good too have on hand, especially when you want to throw in a subtle hint of smoke and beautiful red color!

So here’s the recipe you voted for and were waiting so long to get your hands on!

Smokey Chicken

Ingredients:

  • 5 drumsticks (you can also use 2-3 breasts)
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • pinch of cayenne pepper (more or less depending on your love of spice)
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Place apple cider vinegar, canola oil, garlic, and all of the spices into an iron skillet (or oven safe pan). Heat until simmering.
  2. Place drumsticks with the skin removed or pulled down into the skillet. Cook on the stove top for 5 minutes on each side of the drumstick.
  3. Place skillet into the oven for 15 minutes or until internal temperature of the chicken reaches 165 degrees.

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NOTES:

  • For more drumsticks just double the recipe on the vinegar, oil, spices. Extra isn’t a bad thing!
  • For breasts make sure you don’t dry them out.
  • INTERNAL TEMPERATURE IS SUPER IMPORTANT! Get yourself a food thermometer ($5 at walmart) or a more fancy version (I have one that goes into the oven with the meat and tells me when it’s done).
  • For more smoke add more smoked paprika
  • I served my smokey chicken with mashed potatoes and steamed broccoli…it was delicious!

How do you use smoked paprika?

Tomato Veggie Slow Cooker Pork Loin

When I was younger my grandmother made these incredible pork chops. They were breaded, pan fried, and then baked with tomatoes and onions. I still remember how they tasted. She hasn’t made them in a long time but my parents have taken this recipe and made it better for you. To get the recipe, I called my dad because he is the one who usually makes the dish and apparently this started the “pork chop recipe battle of 2016” between my parents as they fervently discussed who’s recipe it is. Honestly, whoever’s recipe it is, it is a keeper! This is a dish that my husband and I ask for quite often because it is so delicious!

When I’m cooking I like to take a recipe that I’ve found and put a spin on it so that’s exactly what I’ve done to this one. From my grandmothers original breaded pork chops to my parents unbreaded baked pork chops I took it one step further with a pork loin and I think you’ll really enjoy it…I know we did!

When you buy pork loins at the store they usually come in packs of 2 (about 2 pounds each loin). I used both in this recipe but you can certainly cut it in half and do pork barbecue or cut your own chops (pork chops come from the loin) from the other one. Look for the leanest one…the one without a huge fat layer and marbling. Pork loin is the leanest cut from the pork but it still can have a layer of fat and some marbling.

NUTRITION SIDE NOTE: Marbling is the white swirls in pork, beef, and lamb. This is fat…saturated fat. It carries a lot of cholesterol (it also carries a lot of flavor). Look for meat without a lot of marbling and add flavor through oils, herbs, and spices.

In every recipe I make there’s an ingredient that many people do not think of adding. I like to be creative yet practical and invent recipes that people would actually make at home but also push you out of your comfort zone a little. My secret weapon in this recipe are capers. If you’ve never used/eaten a caper before I promise you are missing out! The are relatively inexpensive (for a jar that will last me months it cost $1.50) and have a taste that will knock your socks off! They are salty and briny…but not strong like olives. D-E-L-I-C-I-O-U-S!

There’s another catch to this recipe. I add tons of vegetables because a diet that is 2/3 vegetable based has been shown to reduce your risk of many diseases like heart disease and cancer. THAT is why a healthy diet is important. Weight management is important but that is a side note…health, now that’s where it is at kids!

The steps are simple…

Chop:

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Season

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Layer

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Smother

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Cook it!

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OK the recipe you’ve all been waiting for!

Tomato Veggie Slow Cooker Pork Loin

Ingredients:

  • 5 stalks celery
  • 3 whole carrots
  • 2 bell peppers
  • 3 medium onions (2 large)
  • Pork loin (I used 2, 2 pound loins)
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (omit if watching your sodium intake)
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1, 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
  • 1, 28 oz can diced tomatoes

Directions

  1. Chop celery, carrots, peppers, and half of the onions (larger pieces about 1 inch). Put them in the bottom of a large slow cooker.
  2. Place pork loins in a large bowl and rub capers, garlic, oregano, turmeric, salt, and pepper over the loin to get the flavors surrounding it. I cut small slits into the loin and stuffed them with the garlic and capers.
  3. Put the loins over the vegetables and pour the balsamic vinegar over the loin and veggies.
  4. Place the can of crushed tomatoes around the pork loin and layer the rest of the onions on top. Top it off with the can of diced tomatoes. I also put another teaspoon of capers on top of the diced tomatoes but this is optional…I really like capers!
  5. Cook on high 6 hours or low 8-10 hours.

I served the pork loin with parsley and lemon red skin potatoes and a side salad with homemade balsamic vinaigrette dressing.

Parsley and Lemon Red Skin Potatoes

Ingredients:

  • 6 small red skin potatoes cut in 1 inch cubes (skins on)
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chives
  • 1/3 lemon (about 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice)

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients into a glass dish. Using a steamer lid (or a glass plate on top) microwave on high for 10 minutes.
  2. Season with salt and pepper to taste (can also use more herbs and spices)

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Recipe Notes: this slow cooker recipe takes about 10 minutes to prepare. You can sear the tenderloin in a pan first but it is not necessary. The meat is fall apart tender without the sear. It is so quick, easy, and delicious.

Pork loin recipe cost: about $15 for  8 servings (4 oz of meat). That is $1.87 per serving!